The messy world of supplements

A delayed celiac diagnosis means I struggle with adequate nutrition. I’m still combatting a lifetime of unabsorbed nutrients. It’s exhausting.

I have to rely on supplements in some cases, and supplements are the Wild West of the nutrition world. Little regulation goes into them, and it’s entirely possible that vitamin bottle doesn’t contain any vitamins at all, and the only way you’ll ever know is if someone tests it, or if it contains something risky and someone gets hurt.

I am allergic to lanolin, which is used to produce the majority of vitamin D3 supplements. D3 seems to be better absorbed by most people (especially those with gut problems) compared to non-lanolin derived D2. I took massive doses of D2 for months with no impact on my single-digit levels. I managed lanolin-derived D3 for awhile, but eventually the allergy symptoms got too severe. In the last several years, a vegetarian source of D3 has been discovered (lichen), which works well enough.

A new bottle of D3 I recently purchased caused me a lanolin-like reaction. I decided to write the company, because it seemed like the wrong D was in the bottle. I emailed the company with the lot number, explained the situation, and hoped they’d look into it.

They contract with a 3rd party QA service, which asked me to call them on the phone. I talk on the phone a lot for work and I’m exhausted. I asked if they would work by email. The email bounced back and there is no way to get a hold of them without calling on the phone.

I emailed the manufacturer again and explained I am tired and disabled. I’m happy to help you with this free labor, but please let me do it by email. They said they would.

I never heard back from them, and today I got an email reply, weeks later, claiming I gave them an invalid lot number so the case was being closed. I checked my sent mail, and the lot number they’re working on is different than the one in my original email.

Seems like working by email should prevent this, because everything is in writing, but the communication still got all bungled up.

I replied with the correct lot number, but who knows what’ll happen.

No one even offered a coupon for the two brand new bottles of D3, which are medically necessary but unsafe to take.

Celiac + allergies under capitalism is a dangerous existence.

what to do now?

do i blog again? do i give up on any kind of public voice? i honestly have no idea. maybe let’s try again.

i’ve been seeing people touting the miracle that is oat milk, framed as an alternative to almond milk, which is currently being demonized for the perceived amount of resources required. however, almonds are still better than animal-based dairy, and subsidies are never factored into these calculations. Not only that, but almonds themselves grow on trees that don’t need replanting year after year, which is better for the air quality for local workers and residents, compared to fields replanted each season (and that’s not even addressing the less ethical practices of field burning as a means of turning it over for a new crop).

anyway… i wish that the oat bandwagon wasn’t shitting on people with celiac and wheat allergy. seems like the vast majority of gluten-free fad dieters are totes cool with oating the hell out of their lives, and since companies only care about selling product, they sure as shit don’t care about oat contamination for the small minority of the GF market who has to be GF for medical reasons.

yet another way the world isn’t made for people like me.